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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
's probably the best way to describe the fiscal talks between president obama and house speaker john boehner. with christmas less than two weeks away, the white house is faced with the same key question. can boehner deliver the votes for whatever deal they agree on? >> i remain optimistic and i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage to try to protect tax cuts for high income individuals. >> but with time running out, neither side seems to have budged very far from the original proposal. the only good news about what happened in the past 24 hours, they are not publicly trashing each other's proposals. on monday the white house sent boehner a counteroffer which at beast can be incremental movement. almost on the details of the offer are under wraps. the $1.6 trillion in tax revenue the president was demanding can come down to slightly under 1.4 trillion. it's still $600 billion higher than the republican position. in a signal to the president in his conference, basically said the president's counteroffer was uncut. >> where are the president's spending cu
michigan plant, the white house came out against the move sighing president obama has long opposed right-to-work laws and continues to oppose them now. by the way, a quick little aside on this disagreement among conservatives about what tactic boehner should take "the journal" versus kristol. this gives boehner more room, more power, more of an ability to get a deal done because there isn't conservative consensus on how to back seat cut boehner. secretary of state hillary clinton finishes up her final weeks as america's top diplomat and has to contemplate her next move. the clinton world is not sitting quietly, though. t "the new york times" kicked off what is likely to become a monthly exercise by somebody in the media. we may come up with a meter. probably throw in jeb in there, right? we should call it the hillary jebatron version 2016. probably jon stewart starting that up already. jodie cantor interviewed a number of clinton aides about future plans and strikingly a lot of them talked. while clinton has dozens of options when she leaves the state department, cantor makes a smart obs
to draft such a plan to compromise on a tax rate above 35% but below 39.2% unless the white house agreed to a tax revenue target well below the $1.6 trillion obama has demanded over the next decade. hello. open door anybody? that door on rates is clearly not entirely shut on the republican side nor on the president's side. "the post" lays out a scenario in which the house could adopt two competing bills, one extending the bush rates for everyone including the wealthy. the other extending the bush rates just for those making less than $250,000 a year. it gives republicans the opportunity to vote on both bills. both bills would then go to the senate. which would just pass the middle class tax cut bill or the house would end up passing what the senate already passed and that other bill just goes to die. so with it looking less and less likely washington will go over the cliff, that's gone. here are the real questions now. one, how big a deal will the parties make before the end of the year? two, have republicans stumbled into what could be political leverage at least in the short term? if a
on whether president obama had the authority to make the recess appointments he did last year. justice correspondent pete williams. so, pete, what happened was basically the white house didn't view the senate as in recess though republicans were doing the same gig. >> reporter: the question here legally, is the senate in recess. the obama administration says, no. the sessions are a sham. they last less than a minute. the congress or the senate when it decided to do this passed an order saying that no business would be conducted during these pro forma sessions. what are more do you need? the senate says we'll decide whether we're in recess or not and we say we're not, and not only that in the early part of the recess from december of last year to january of this year, the senate actually passed an extension to the payroll tax cut. so is the senate in recess or not? and this is it either going to go to the supreme court, chuck, or the courts are going to say, you know what, we can't -- this is a dispute between the political branches. you guys work it out. i don't think it's 100% clear w
descended on the capital from washington. but both the michigan state house and senate are controlled by republicans. and this is pretty much inevitable. the labor movement has already lost these fights everywhere else. still, president obama who was making a preplanned stop at a uaw representative factory in the detroit suburbs couldn't escape commenting on the fight so he weighed in yesterday denouncing the proposed new law. >> what we shouldn't be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages and working conditions. so-called right to work laws, they don't have to do with economics, they have everything to do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. >> schneider made this counterargument. >> michigan workers are hard-working people. and shouldn't they be able to make the choice they see value in the union and, again, hopefully make the unions more accountable and work harder to make sure they're showing workers the value proposition is why they should pay. >> and now you just heard the message as to why
and representative nancy pelosi have been excluded from talks leaving it to boehner and obama to make a deal. though boehner spokesman michael steele tells us this morning if we're going to solve this problem every congressional leader and more importantly the white house have all important roles to play. the fact is we've heard this same thing. and that is that pelosi and the senate leaders are not in the room at first. they'll be brought in when boehner and the white house are close. mann while, back to the debt ceiling. the new republicans' main point of leverage n. a rare misstep, mcconnell may have taken some of that leverage away in a move that ended with mcconnell filibustering himself. the president doesn't have enough democratic support, mcconnell moved to vote to permanently give the president the rate to approve the debt ceiling. reid shocked mcconnell by calling the idea of having that vote a positive development. forcing him to reject a vote he had called for himself. >> is there objection? >> reserving the right to object, matters of this controversy -- what we're talking about here is
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)